Adventure

Camera captures tiger shark's inner mouth in exciting footage

29/04/2022
Written by Oceanographic Staff

Have you ever wondered what a shark’s mouth looks like when it feeds on something? A 360-degree camera captured a fascinating look inside a tiger shark’s mouth when the predator mistook the gadget for food.

The 27-second video, taken and published on Instagram by filmmaker @zimydakid, shows a tiger shark grabbing a camera and chewing it inside its mouth. The footage reveals what a shark’s mouth looks like when it feeds on something. Interestingly, beyond the sharp teeth, the inner mouth appears smooth.

After chewing it for a few seconds, the tiger shark realised that the camera isn’t food and decided to spit it out. The shark and the camera were unharmed during the process.

The filmmaker behind the footage hopes that the film causes people to fall in love with sharks and that it increases fascination with the species.

He wrote on Facebook: “As an artist, creator and ocean lover, I truly believe that, through filmmaking and cinematography, we have a major role to play when it comes to conservation and fighting for the natural world. Art has this unique power of being able to create emotions within people and once people start loving something, they start caring about it and protecting it. This is exactly what I want to do through my art!”

“I want to inspire other creators to use their skills and talent to create meaningful things, things that will raise awareness, things that will not only generate emotions but that will also educate people about the huge challenges that nature is facing nowadays,” he continued.

Watch the video here.

For more from our Ocean Newsroom, click here.
Photography courtesy of Ocean Image Bank / Hannes Klostermann.

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