Ocean Pollution

500 barrels of oil leaking into Irish Sea

Written by Oceanographic Staff

The North Wales coastline is being monitored after hydrocarbons were released into the Irish Sea following a pipeline failure.

Authorities are monitoring the Welsh coastline of the Irish Sea after a pipeline failed that connects the Conwy and Douglas oil installations around 20 miles off the coast. The pipeline company, Eni UK, reported the incident on Monday and says that less than 500 barrels of oil leaked into the ocean after hydrocarbons were released into the ocean.

A company statement read: “Eni UK Ltd can confirm that a release of hydrocarbons from its pipeline between the Conwy and Douglas installations, approximately 33km from the north Wales coast, was reported on Monday 14 February.” Following the incident, the pipeline was shut immediately and remains off until details are further assessed.

Natural England, an environment body, is monitoring the situation and commented that it had “plans in place” if they were needed. Simon Hart, Welsh Secretary, said: “Any residual oil is not expected to beach on the north Wales coastline and teams are in place on the Lancashire coast ready to respond if any oil beaches there.”

However, on 16 February, shortly after the pipeline spill was announced, the news outlet LancsLive reported that tar balls washed up on Blackpool beaches. An Eni UK spokesperson said: “We are aware of a number of small tar balls washing up on a section of the Blackpool coast. The clean-up teams are onsite and working closely with the local authorities and coastguard.”

For more from our Ocean Newsroom, click here.

Photography courtesy of Unsplash.

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